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Crews at Buffalo Fire September 1, 2016
Crews at Buffalo Fire September 1, 2016

No Growth In Maple Fire As Crews Continue Burnout Operations

With warm, breezy weather in Yellowstone, residents and visitors should expect smoke plumes from the Maple, Buffalo, and Central Fires.

In spite of increased smoke, the air quality forecast still calls for good conditions around the Park. See the full forecast below.

air-quality-forecast-september-10-2016

Fire growth yesterday was minimal, with some fires (Maple and Jasper) not showing any growth whatsoever since our Friday report.

According to a Yellowstone press release, crews are continuing burnout operations on the edge of Maple Fire along the Madison River, which has been ongoing since Thursday. The Bakers Hole area is closed for the duration of burnout operations. Crews will continue to patrol the fire’s edge.

To the north, Buffalo Fire grew 40 acres and now measures 10,828 acres. Firefighters continue to patrol the east side of the fire in the Slough Creek drainage. From time to time, you can see Buffalo Fire from the Mount Washburn Fire Lookout – Northeast Webcam.

Fawn Fire, meanwhile, grew two acres and now measures 2,686 acres. Central Fire, west of Lake Junction, gained 48 acres and now measures 1,398 acres, burning to the west and north toward heavier timber. You can see Central Fire from the Mount Washburn Fire Lookout – South Webcam,

Fawn, Central, and Jasper are still unstaffed and will be monitored from the air.

Stage 1 Fire Restrictions are still in place for Yellowstone National Park. All park roads and visitor facilities, both NPS- and concessionaire-operated, are open at this time.

About Sean Reichard

Sean Reichard is the editor of Yellowstone Insider and author of Yellowstone Insider For Families 2017.

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